Running and Event

We welcome astronomy projects of all kinds, including workshops, tours, talks, sky observation activities, classroom projects, lectures, field trips, art projects and more! The sky's the limit with possible astronomy projects for the 100 Hours of Astronomy event in January 2019.

Here are some tips for running an event that involves sky observations:

Choosing a Location 

Try to avoid spaces that are near busy roads or other sources of frequent headlights. Remember to provide your own power supply if you are using a GoTo scope or laptop. Try to choose a location with a good horizon. Often when people are new to astronomy, they think about the darkest places they know and forget about trees and hills. Keep an eye on the weather conditions and check your local weather forecasts. If you are holding your event away from the city, post a sign along the roadway. Advertise your event with your local media outlets.

  

Observatories and Science Centres 

When holding events at public facilities such as Science Centers and observatories, make sure to coordinate well in advance by checking the location beforehand and making early contact with center representative. Check for electrical access if you need it, find out about parking, loading/unloading, and water sprinklers. Make sure you know exactly where you will be setting up your telescopes and equipment. Ask about specific rules or regulations and the times of the planetarium shows or other events going on inside, find the restrooms and rubbish bins.
 

Sidewalk Events

Make sure you pick a location where you feel safe and work together in groups where possible. Besides actual sidewalk corners, there are other locations that work just as well. Near restaurants, book stores, movie theaters, coffee shops, convenience stores, city centre parks, libraries, and subway, bus and train stops. We suggest these locations because they have certain requirements that we find necessary for sidewalk observations. If finding a location is difficult setup out in your front yard, local street or in front of your apartment building. Don’t set up too many scopes in one area if it blocks foot traffic. Its better to spread out.
 

Do 

-Stay safe and check all restrictions/ordinances requiring a permit.
-Choose a location near your home or a place you like. Coffee houses, cafes and book stores are great places.
-Pick locations that are fairly populated and reasonably busy with foot traffic.
-Make sure there are facilities near by if you need to use them
-Check your horizon to be sure a building won’t be in the way and keep in mind how things will change during the evening.

 

Don't

-Block foot traffic
-Block entrances to businesses
-Set up directly under street lights or heavily lit areas 
-Break any local ordinances or city laws

logoNAOJ.png

IAU 100 Global Partners

NOAO Block Logo (Med).png
NSF_4-Color_bitmap_Logo.png
Universiteit_Leiden.png
AURA Logo.png
logo-donker.png
unawe_logo-2.png
Moore_Foundation_Logo.png

IAU Organisational Associates

Nova_logo_NEW_rechthoek_verloop_RGBblauw
LIGO.png
AUI logo color.fb.png
eso-logo-p3005.jpg
SKA logo.png
IPS-darkblue-logo.png
NRAO_logo_white_border.png
asu-logo-v1-en-cmyk-positive-color.png
RAS.png

Project Partners

IAU 100 Patron Sponsors

100 Hours of Astronomy 2019 - IAU100